Visit to NSA

The National Security Agency (NSA) has a large campus on Fort Meade, Maryland, protected by fences, barbed wire, police dogs, guards, and maybe a dragon or two. It is not visitor friendly.

But right outside of the campus is the National Cryptologic Museum,  an old motel once used by visitors for housing guests. The motel is no longer a motel, but a rather casually laid out museum, sprawling through hallways and odd spaces, filled with artifacts on the art of sending, receiving, and stealing secret messages.

This formerly super-secret agency (nicknamed “No Such Agency,” as even the name was a secret) recently displayed a sign in the entrance claiming it was a Pokémon Go stop, which is a major step forward into the world of publicity.

The National Cryptologic Museum at Fort Meade started advertising itself as a Pokemon Go "Pokéstop" shortly after the Pokemon Go craze started. You could hunt for Pokemon and learn about secret messages at the same time.
The National Cryptologic Museum at Fort Meade started advertising itself as a Pokémon Go “Pokéstop” shortly after the Pokémon Go craze started. You could hunt for Pokémon and learn about secret messages at the same time.

Right inside, and probably to the great surprise of the British Museum, is the Rosetta Stone, one of the best examples of coding from the ancient world,

The Rosetta Stone, often thought to be housed at the British Museum in London, but really located outside the gift shop of the National Cryptologic Museum in Fort Meade, MD. Unlike that one in London, this one is easier to photograph and touch.
The Rosetta Stone, often thought to be housed at the British Museum in London, but really located outside the gift shop of the National Cryptologic Museum in Fort Meade, MD. Unlike that one in London, this one is easier to photograph and touch.

The museum houses artifacts that may not so obviously be associated with cryptology, such as a hunk of wreckage from Gary Powers’ U-2 surveillance aircraft, shot down over the Soviet Union on May 1, 1960. The Soviets fired fourteen missiles at the high-flying  U-2, finally hitting it with an S-75 Dvina, specially designed for the attempt. The Soviets also accidentally shot down one of their own MiG-19 fighters, sent up in an attempt to intercept the U-2.

The wreckage of the U-2 fell almost 14 miles before hitting the ground. A piece of that wreckage was presented to the US by Russia in 1994.

A piece of the wreckage from Gary Powers' U-2 surveillance aircraft, shot down by the Soviets in 1960 and presented to the US by the Russian government in 1994.
A piece of the wreckage from Gary Powers’ U-2 surveillance aircraft, shot down by the Soviets in 1960 and presented to the US by the Russian government in 1994.

You can check out a earlier blog entry for more photos and information about the museum, including the famed Enigma coding machine.