Category Archives: Washington State

Light of other days

This photo was taken well after sundown. The light on the ridgeline is reflected from snow off the Olympic Mountains, bouncing back into the sky and reflected again off the clouds. It looks as if it could be from city lights, but there is no city in this direction, just mountains for a hundred miles or so. Light of other days: light bouncing off of snow and sky, well after sundown, in the Olympic Mountains.

The photo is also an excellent demonstration of the low-light capabilities of the iPhone X. The human eye can distinguish many subtle variations in light and color, and cameras are not yet even close to such sophistication. But they are making astonishing strides, especially when backed up with the computer power of a sophisticated phone.

Buzzed. Busted. Broke.

This billboard is in downtown Bremerton, Washington. The text: “Buzzed. Busted. Broke. Get caught buzzed driving and it could cost you $10,000” suggests that this could be advice from a financial counselor. Or perhaps the police, as there were signs nearby reserving space for court parking.

One curious note: the billboard is really a drape over the frame of the billboard, rather than the usual plastic or paper billboard glued to the frame. This suggests it could be an ephemeral piece of advice; it might cost you $10,000 today, but that could change the next time they need the billboard space.

From the illustrations in the center, it also appears to suggest you should beware of driving 1950s station wagons after drinking root beer or having cups of ice.

Sign in Bremerton, Washington, suggesting that you should not drive 1950s station wagons when buzzed or it could cost you ten grand.
Sign in Bremerton, Washington, suggesting that you should not drive 1950s station wagons when buzzed or it could cost you ten grand.

Poulsbo: paradise?

Poulsbo is a small town in northern Kitsap County, which in turn is a peninsula located between Hood Canal and Puget Sound in Washington State. For most purposes, it is functionally an island, with just one lone land highway connecting to the rest of North America. A floating bridge crosses Hood Canal to connect to the Olympic Peninsula, and ferries travel from Kitsap to Edmonds, Tacoma, and Seattle, Washington.

In other words, it is a bit out-of-the-way, but still connected. And this is an afternoon photo of the Poulsbo waterfront in late afternoon.

Looks like paradise.

Poulsbo waterfront on a late afternoon in April. Is this paradise, or just a close competitor?
Poulsbo waterfront on a late afternoon in April. Is this paradise, or just a close competitor?

This is a lunch salad

This salad is piled atop a 12-inch plate. It is a lunch salad, from the Oak Table Cafe in Silverdale, Washington. (Location).

It was delicious. We came. We tried. But the salad won.

This is a lunch salad, from the Oak Table Cafe in Silverdale, Washington.
This is a lunch salad, from the Oak Table Cafe in Silverdale, Washington.

Dungeness Spit panorama

Dungeness Spit is a nearly six-mile long sand spit that curves out from the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It is a spectacular setting. On this day you can see both Canada — the mountains of Vancouver Island can be seen in the middle distance — as well as Mount Baker — the white mountain at the far right of the photo, more than 140 miles away.

On any given day, the spit is covered with a complex, ever-changing mound of giant logs and other debris that has washed ashore. Hiking to the end of the spit, to see the New Dungeness Lighthouse (built in 1857), is a non-trivial effort.

Click on the image for a (much) larger view. You can just barely see the New Dungeness Lighthouse below Mt. Baker in the full-size view.

Dungeness Spit, near the town of Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. This panoramic photo was taken with an iPhone 6 Plus.
Dungeness Spit, near the town of Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. This panoramic photo was taken with an iPhone 6 Plus.